Dead Person Switches - secrets from beyond the grave

More commonly known as a Dead Man’s Switch, a Dead Person Switch (DPS) is a system that can hold a secret on behalf of a person, and govern its release should they become unavailable.

Rainbow paws

Art is fun and hard and messy and complicated and like every other trade it’s full of people who are earnestly showing you what they created (sprinkled with a few jokers).

TIL - shell environment variables aren't available to OS X apps

Just recently I have been exploring a very strange issue: My application couldn’t find a tool that was right where it should be…

Dead Person Switches - appeal for journalists

I am hoping to interview some investigative journalists for my masters thesis at the University of Oxford.

A template thesis to simplify your write-up

The things I’ll do to avoid learning LaTeX… Do you prefer Markdown to LaTeX?

Making the best possible referrals

The Data Standards Authority are holding an open challenge to discover and set a new data standard for vulnerable people services.

Building an AWS Lambda in C#, part 6: Triggers

In part 5, we amended our Lambda to write to an S3 bucket; and in this part, we’ll explore triggers to run it regularly.

Building an AWS Lambda in C#, part 5: S3

In previous parts, we’ve built a Lambda that can query the OpenWeather API, using a secret key; and in this part we’ll extend it to write that data to S3.

Building an AWS Lambda in C#, part 4: Logs

In part 3, we extended our Lambda to communicate with an API, using a secret key; and in this part, we’ll explore the logs created when the Lambda runs.

Building an AWS Lambda in C#, part 3: APIs and secrets

In part 2, we build a Lambda function, deployed and invoked it; and in this part, we’ll extend it to communicate with an API using a secret key.